2024 Super Bowl Gatorade odds, predictions: Purple the favorite, but it probably shouldn't be

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The Athletic

Of all the prop bets and ridiculous things we can bet on for Super Bowl LVIII between the Kansas City Chiefs and San Francisco 49ers, perhaps one of the weirder prop bets that is available every season involves a tradition that takes place after the game has been decided – the color of Gatorade that gets dumped on the winning coach.

Last year, Andy Reid was doused in purple Gatorade following the Chiefs win over the Philadelphia Eagles. That bet paid at +1000, meaning if you bet $100, you would have won $1,000. Not too shabby.

Now, purple is the favorite again because the Chiefs used that color last year? That makes no sense. If you look at the history of the Gatorade bath we’ve compiled, there seems to be no rhyme or reason for the color used. From an entertaining bet point of view, waiting to see what color is dumped on the coach is a fun sweat for the end of the game or a friendly wager with your friend. But from a strategic point of view, the Gatorade dump isn’t one of the best bets out there since it seems to be completely random.

History of Super Bowl Gatorade bath

YEARTEAMCOLOR

2023

Purple

2022

Blue

2021

Blue

2020

Orange

2019

Blue

2018

Yellow/Green

2017

None

2016

Orange

2015

Blue

2014

Orange

2013

None

2012

Purple

2011

Orange

2010

Orange

2009

Yellow/Green

2008

Clear

2007

Clear

2006

Clear

2005

Clear

2004

None

2003

Purple

2002

None

2001

Yellow/Green

 

All odds from BetMGM.

The long shots are red (which has not been used one time since 2000) and clear/water, and no gatorade bath.

Gatorade insists that the color is completely randomized every season and that teams have multiple buckets to choose from so nobody knows for sure which color is going to end up on the winning coach.

While the color is random, there has been a dominant trend in recent years. Since the New Orleans Saints Super Bowl win in 2010 – orange and blue have been used in eight of those 13 Super Bowls. Before that yellow/green and clear were the dominant colors.

Since 2010, purple has also been used twice along with clear/water. Yellow/green has been used just once during that stretch.

The Gatorade bath dates back to the 1984 New York Giants when player Jim Burt dumped a bucket on head coach Bill Parcells. It initially continued as a Giants tradition after big wins for a couple of years before other teams started doing it following the Giants’ 1986 Super Bowl win.

Super Bowl Gatorade pick

The Gatorade bath appears to be completely random for the most part unless I’m missing something. It almost seems as random as the coin toss and maybe that is the point. It’s just a funny thing to have in your prop pool or throw $10 on for entertainment at the game’s end. If you’re just making a pick for your home party props pool and there’s no benefit in taking a longshot, I think orange is a good pick.

If you’re betting using odds, clear/water had a clear trend a few years ago and we know there is water on every sideline. My best bet would be on water at +1000 given the longshot odds and the fact that the choice of color seems pretty random. — Andrew DeWitt, sports betting editor 

(Photo illustration: Sean Reilly / The Athletic; Photos: Streeter Lecka and Kevin Sabitus / Getty Images)